Simple, easy-to-follow steps detail how to develop a lasting workout regimen.

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STICK WITH EXERCISE FOR A LIFETIME

HOW TO ENJOY EVERY MINUTE OF IT!

Former Occidental College swimming and water polo coach Hopper (Healthcare Happily Ever After, 2007, etc.) offers a concise guide to developing an exercise program.

Hopper notes that seven out of 10 Americans don’t get enough exercise to be healthy. He provides readers with eight short chapters full of inspiring examples and steps to start a fitness regimen and, more importantly, stay with it. Written in lively, conversational prose, each chapter examines one aspect of Hopper’s plan, starting with the one he proclaims most important: fun. The point is to find something effortless and enjoyable, such as dancing, body surfing, mountain or rock climbing, and gradually increase the amount of practice time and effort put into that activity until it becomes second nature. The guide strongly recommends finding a coach to explain how to do the activity safely and effectively, joining a team to provide participants with a support system and exercise buddies, protecting the scheduled time for activity, and seeking supplementary fitness activities that complement the preferred activity, such as taking weight training classes to improve stamina for dancing. Hopper even includes lists of responses to the typical reasons/excuses people use to get out of physical activity. Unfortunately, the author doesn’t cover the reason many abandon their sport: injuries sustained while attempting something new or while trying to move from one level of fitness to another. A chapter on safe workouts, low-impact modifications to activities, and how to keep motivated while in recovery from an injury would have made the guide more complete.

Simple, easy-to-follow steps detail how to develop a lasting workout regimen.

Pub Date: June 27, 2012

ISBN: 978-1467909938

Page Count: 128

Publisher: CreateSpace

Review Posted Online: Aug. 2, 2012

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A cleareyed, concise look at current and future affairs offering pertinent points to reflect and debate.

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TEN LESSONS FOR A POST-PANDEMIC WORLD

The CNN host and bestselling author delivers a pithy roundup of some of the inevitable global changes that will follow the current pandemic.

Examining issues both obvious and subtler, Zakaria sets out how and why the world has changed forever. The speed with which the Covid-19 virus spread around the world was shocking, and the fallout has been staggering. In fact, writes the author, “it may well turn out that this viral speck will cause the greatest economic, political, and social damage to humankind since World War II.” The U.S., in particular, was exposed as woefully unprepared, as government leadership failed to deliver a clear, practical message, and the nation’s vaunted medical institutions were caught flat-footed: "Before the pandemic…Americans might have taken solace in the country’s great research facilities or the huge amounts of money spent on health care, while forgetting about the waste, complexity and deeply unequal access that mark it as well." While American leaders wasted months denying the seriousness of Covid-19 and ignoring the advice of medical experts, other countries—e.g., South Korea, New Zealand, and Taiwan—acted swiftly and decisively, underscoring one of the author's main themes and second lesson: "What matters is not the quantity of government but the quality.” Discussing how “markets are not enough,” the author astutely shoots down the myth that throwing money at the problem can fix the situation; as such, he predicts a swing toward more socialist-friendly policies. Zakaria also delves into the significance of the digital economy, the resilience of cities (see the success of Hong Kong, Singapore, and Taipei in suppressing the virus), the deepening of economic inequality around the world, how the pandemic has exacerbated the rift between China and the U.S. (and will continue to do so), and why “people should listen to the experts—and experts should listen to the people."

A cleareyed, concise look at current and future affairs offering pertinent points to reflect and debate.

Pub Date: Oct. 6, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-393-54213-4

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Norton

Review Posted Online: Aug. 27, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 15, 2020

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Skloot's meticulous, riveting account strikes a humanistic balance between sociological history, venerable portraiture and...

THE IMMORTAL LIFE OF HENRIETTA LACKS

A dense, absorbing investigation into the medical community's exploitation of a dying woman and her family's struggle to salvage truth and dignity decades later.

In a well-paced, vibrant narrative, Popular Science contributor and Culture Dish blogger Skloot (Creative Writing/Univ. of Memphis) demonstrates that for every human cell put under a microscope, a complex life story is inexorably attached, to which doctors, researchers and laboratories have often been woefully insensitive and unaccountable. In 1951, Henrietta Lacks, an African-American mother of five, was diagnosed with what proved to be a fatal form of cervical cancer. At Johns Hopkins, the doctors harvested cells from her cervix without her permission and distributed them to labs around the globe, where they were multiplied and used for a diverse array of treatments. Known as HeLa cells, they became one of the world's most ubiquitous sources for medical research of everything from hormones, steroids and vitamins to gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, even the polio vaccine—all without the knowledge, must less consent, of the Lacks family. Skloot spent a decade interviewing every relative of Lacks she could find, excavating difficult memories and long-simmering outrage that had lay dormant since their loved one's sorrowful demise. Equal parts intimate biography and brutal clinical reportage, Skloot's graceful narrative adeptly navigates the wrenching Lack family recollections and the sobering, overarching realities of poverty and pre–civil-rights racism. The author's style is matched by a methodical scientific rigor and manifest expertise in the field.

Skloot's meticulous, riveting account strikes a humanistic balance between sociological history, venerable portraiture and Petri dish politics.

Pub Date: Feb. 9, 2010

ISBN: 978-1-4000-5217-2

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2010

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