EIGHTEEN ACRE: UNDER GLASS by Robert Keith Gray
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EIGHTEEN ACRE: UNDER GLASS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The number of Americans who tour the White House each year is now greater than the total population of the U.S. when the mansion was first tenanted."" Set amid 18 acres of rolling the home of the Chief Executive and his family is a cherished, say, hallowed, symbol to the land over. The care lavished on details of its upkeep, security, and to the needs and desires of successive Presidents is fascinating in its comple. Mrs. recent telecast outlining her renovating and restoring activities again focused a spotlight on the mansion, so since about a third of Gray's book on the historical significance of the White House and its contents, it will have wide popular appeal in that alone. No doubt, however, the crux of the book lies within the other two thirds, which cover the day-to-day, microscopic implications of the later years of the Administration. Gray, as special assistant, then appointments' secretary, and then first to the Cabinet, was privy to the most intimate insight into the structure schedules, the mechanics of political power, and the social of official Washington. His sidelights on the stories of Sherman Adams, other figures, the Secret Service, the research and secretarial staffs, the and the 1960 transfer of the reins of government to the incoming Administration all the ring of authenticity. A great many Americans still ""like "". The with which Gray has portrayed him, and to an even greatet extent the problems of the office, will compassion of even the most hard-boiled Democrat. This should be sure fire.

Pub Date: May 18th, 1962
Publisher: Doubleday