CLEANING UP AMERICA: An Insider's View of the Environmental Protection Agency by

CLEANING UP AMERICA: An Insider's View of the Environmental Protection Agency

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KIRKUS REVIEW

I am one of those bureaucrats everyone complains of,"" writes John Quarles, and in his very personal account of life and hard times within the Environmental Protection Agency he attempts to debunk the notions, ""largely based on ignorance,"" that bureaucrats are lazy, incompetent, pointy-headed, red-tape maniacs who carry Peanut butter sandwiches to work in brown paper bags. Quarles has served in the EPA since its creation in 1970 and, though his version of the struggle to regulate the lead in gasoline, toxic automobile emissions, and water pollution makes for intriguing drama at times, Quarles seems more intent upon convincing his readers that what he really eats are cold cheeseburgers and TV dinners; in other words, that he and his colleagues are just regular guys trying to do their ""dead level best"" to make the environment a healthy and safe one. The focus appears to be askew; Robert Sansom's The New American Dream Machine (see below) is more to the point.

Pub Date: Oct. 15th, 1976
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin