CONFLICT IN EDUCATION by Robert M. Hutchins

CONFLICT IN EDUCATION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

With seven tracts (among them- Higher Learning in America; Morals, Religion and Higher Education) and staunch sponsorship of the ""100 Great Books"" plan in education to his credit, the former Chancellor of the University of Chicago makes a strong case for the all importance of liberal arts. To prove his point, Mr. Hutchins first discusses three alternatives. These are- the theory that education's aim should be to adapt the individual to the environment; that it should be to meet immediate needs at vocational and specialization levels; that it should be to reform society. The first he rejects on the grounds that the adjustment is often to a bad or childish environment. The fault of the second lies in improper identification of needs and consequent disintegration of learning's bulk. In the third he draws particular attention to misconceptions of Dewey with the contention that reforms are too often preconceived and limiting and that this system makes little provision for a continuing future. And so with a heartening vigour that dispels the notion that a liberal education is strictly for the elite, the author calls for a thorough, and early, study of mankind by way of the broad ideational backgrounds that made the present and without which we cannot build a future. Think about this one.

Pub Date: Sept. 16th, 1953
Publisher: Harper