MOST OF ALL, THEY TAUGHT ME HAPPINESS by Robert Muller

MOST OF ALL, THEY TAUGHT ME HAPPINESS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Recipes for happiness"" from a high-up UN administrator whose cosmopolitan life is the distinguishing source of otherwise banal ""lessons."" Muller shares the formulas he has culled from his Alsatian childhood, his wartime experiences with the maquis and as a Nazi prisoner, such personal mentors as U Thant, and his 30 years at the UN (""my temple""). Each sermonette begins with an aphorism--e.g., ""Both self-restraint and exuberance can lead to happiness""--and includes an exemplary anecdote to prove what can hardly be gainsaid. ""Man's most precious good is life itself,"" he writes; and the whole bowl of cherries tastes of saccharine. But for the inspirational audience open to the salutary suggestions of the UN's ""optimist in residence,"" it will read like the genuine article it is--with an unmistakable foreign accent.

Pub Date: Nov. 3rd, 1978
Publisher: Doubleday