U.S. MILITARY STRATEGY IN THE SIXTIES by Robert N. Ginsburgh

U.S. MILITARY STRATEGY IN THE SIXTIES

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

The avowed purpose of this volume is to make that ""favorite parlor game"" --military strategy--more intelligible to the informed citizen."" To further this end, a flippant tone of rather questionable taste has been taken. For instance, heading the list of ""rules of the game"" is the statement that ""anyone can play."" But Col. Ginsburgh does have some serious consideration in mind, and his work could serve well enough as a primer or even, in some Ways a useful ""summary synthesis"" for the professional student. The discussions of ""big"" strategy, involving such questions as NATO policy, the eventuality of a Chinese nuclear capacity, and prospects of disarmament, are both quite sound and clearly expressed, as far as they go. The gaps in the book are mainly in such presently more worrisome areas as the sort of limited War going on in Vietnam, and the strategic possibilities for keeping it from escalating. But perhaps it is asking too much of an Air Force officer to expect him to emphasize aspects which are more properly within the Army's Jurisdiction. In any case, his study fairly intelligible, and this in a field not renowned for the quality.

Publisher: Norton