ROBERT PAUL SMITH'S LOST AND FOUND by Robert Paul Smith

ROBERT PAUL SMITH'S LOST AND FOUND

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

After this satisfying catalogue of domestic artifacts, no other nostalgia binge re over-fifties' childhoods ever need be written. No rambling reminiscer, Smith points out just what we want to see and no more. ""This,"" he proclaims, ""is a carpet beater."" And glory! there it is (illustration accompanying), taken from the nail always at the top of the cellar stairs to be used for spreading dust more generously over a larger area. And there's the Nail Buffer and the Coalbin (where a sulking misunderstood youngster figured ""how sorry they'd be when you had lived in the coalbin for fifty or sixty years"") and the Icebox and the Onyx Ashtray and the Rumble Seat. . . . Brief empathic memories as bracing as Lydia Pinkham's -- without the syrup. And meticulous drawings for the uninitiate. Smith is the author of Where Did You Go? Out. What Did You Do? Nothing. and his following won't forget.

Pub Date: Sept. 28th, 1973
Publisher: Charterhouse--dist. by McKay