THE ROMAN TRIUMPH by Robert Payne

THE ROMAN TRIUMPH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

This latest book by the versatile author of Portrait of a Revolutionary, The Gold of Tra. etc., Is a detailed study of the Roman Triumph from its unknown origin to its end: and its changing ritual; its corrupting influence; its modern survivals. ""For over a thousand years Roman conquerors returning from the wars enjoyed the honor of a Triumph"", although not all Triumphators were victorious and some, like never saw battle. Slaves and elephants, prisoners in chains, garlanded bulls destined for sacrifice, the Triamphatur in his chariot, marched in the vast processions, and with the shouting came the ghosts of thousands of Roman soldiers and their enemies, killed in needless wars to make some general or Emperor a Triumph. As Rome grew weaker the Triumphs grew more elaborate, bringing with them an enervating luxury; in the end they became ""a meaningless spectacle attended by the odor of corruption"". In one form or another, however, the Triumph has survived through the centuries in many countries: today New York has its ticker-tape parades, its Washington Square Arch. Filled with scholarly and fascinating material but lacking the luster of The Gold of Tray, this book, one to be taken in small doses, will appeal to readers with a basic knowledge of Roman history and to dedicated students and lovers of the Eternal City.

Pub Date: Jan. 20th, 1962
Publisher: Abelard-Schuman