THEORIES OF LEARNING IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION by Robert R.

THEORIES OF LEARNING IN CHRISTIAN EDUCATION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The church may well have adapted too uncritically any of several current theories of learning in the development of its curricula and programs. Dr. Boehlke makes a thorough analysis of those areas where the secularly developed theories are in conflict with many theological assumptions. He then proposes a new approach, which he calls Creation-Engagement, and to which he applies the same tests that pointed to difficulties in other learning theories. His basic definition in that the concerns of Christian nurture are learned as God creates new selves through the engagement of persons with their field of relationships. This is a technical book, which would leave the average Church School teacher in dismay. However, it is a solid and useful volume for the professionals for whom it was written. These would include Christian Education personnel in denominational boards, pastors, directors of Christian education, faculty and students at Church colleges and seminaries, and any scholar interested in better rapport between learning theory and theology. Of special value is the critical appraisal of the four major learning theories.

Pub Date: Jan. 7th, 1962
Publisher: Westminster