THE END OF SOMEONE ELSE'S RAINBOW by Robert Rossner

THE END OF SOMEONE ELSE'S RAINBOW

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KIRKUS REVIEW

. . . is a pot of greenbacks in an aluminum case near the old farm outside of the town which has since become a raw suburb. Wiley Bridger, once young and restless, had buried it there after holding up a bank. He's now paid his debt -- eighteen years on the Farm -- so does the money really belong to him now? Javitt, a policeman, doesn't think so (""a guy like you is never clean"") and follows him step by wary step even if there isn't much to see. Just Wiley hanging around talking to the local librarian, Francine Pennypack. She's the only one who can help Wiley get at the money and she's ready to take a part of it even if she'd rather have Wiley and the fresh start he hopes to make in New Mexico. . . . Rossner's catchy, personable story should sneak right up on you and it's soundproofed against all the excesses of the crime story for a pleasant change of pace without forfeiting the latter. It could also be converted into a film with no trouble at all.

Pub Date: March 1st, 1974
Publisher: Saturday Review Press/ Dutton