THE OLD MAN'S BOY GROWS OLDER by Robert Ruark

THE OLD MAN'S BOY GROWS OLDER

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Whatever the elusive element that goes by the name of romance, Ruark's latest is liberally flavored with its essence. The Old Man's Boy Grows Older is a sequel to his 50,000 copy opus circa 1957 (The Old Man and the Boy). The present volume attests to Ruark's maturation as an inventor of telling homilies; it is a more thoughtful, more whimsical, and more delightfully entertaining sample of his talents. The Old Man, Ruark's grandfather, was a wise gentleman who taught the Boy how to get the most out of life's homespun riches; Ruark at his present age of 45 or so owns more wonderful memories than most people have dreams, and they lose nothing in the telling. His recollections of Louisiana Cajua cooking are succulent. His views on dogs -- hunters and pets -- are inimitable. His experiences as a big-game hunter in Africa are uproariously funny. One short section describing a sea voyage is most evocative and few can match Ruark's ardor for the outdoor life. This autobiographical adventure story will make many new friends for an author whose popularity is already indisputable.

Publisher: Holt, Rinehart & Winston