FRANCES WRIGHT, FREE INQUIRER by

FRANCES WRIGHT, FREE INQUIRER

By
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KIRKUS REVIEW

A definitive biography of the free thinker and humanitarian, Fanny Wright, who was at the helm in many liberal movements in the 19th century. Moody, self-willed, with a Byronic streak of morbid egotism and rebellion. A protege of Bentham and adoptive child of Lafayette whom she knew extremely well. Her second visit to America determined her in making it her future home. Her first famous experiment was that of Nashoba, a plantation where she attempted to eradicate the color lines, and under the influence of Robert Owen, to establish a community of blacks and whites destined to work in perfect accord. It failed through mismanagement, but not until she became the target for attacks on ""free love."" Then she came on to New York, where she established a Hall of Science for liberals, and launched a paper called The Free Enquirer, which developed into a small political party movement. At 35, she married a man considerably older, whom she did not love, to give her unborn child a name. After a number of years of retirement, she returned to politics and lecturing, preferring these to family discord, and she died ""in harness"", very suddenly. A comprehensive piece of documentation; and a sturdy and interesting biography, with however, small chance for big sales.

Pub Date: Sept. 6th, 1939
Publisher: Harper