THE SOCIAL GOSPEL IN AMERICA: Gladden, Ely and Rauschenbusch by Robert T.-Ed. Handy

THE SOCIAL GOSPEL IN AMERICA: Gladden, Ely and Rauschenbusch

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In a day when the crusades of the Social Gospel Movement in Protestantism ave become, for the most part, the policies and programs of government, it is instructive to have this volume of excerpts from the writings of three of the earlier and most orceful leaders of the movement. The three subjects represent three types of leadership in social reform during the last decades of the nineteenth and the early years of he twentieth century in America. Gladden was pastor of a city church; Richard T. Ely distinguished professor of economics in a State University; and Rauschenbusch a ilitant alum crusader and, later, divinity school prophet. The selections give a lanced and wide-ranging exposition of each man's thinking. Professor Handy, of Union eological Seminary, introduces each with a just and perceptive estimate of his contrition, not only to the movement in his time, but to the continuing process of social form in contemporary society. In so doing, he has restored the names of these three aders to a more significant place in the history, not only of Protestantism, but of progress generally. For students of social thought and of recent church history and for lay people concerned with the social issues of our day.

Pub Date: June 2nd, 1966
Publisher: Oxford