THE EMPIRICAL THEOLOGY OF HENRY NELSON WIEMAN by Robert W.- Ed. Bretail

THE EMPIRICAL THEOLOGY OF HENRY NELSON WIEMAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The Library of Living Theology presents Volume 4 in its series to present definitively the thought of contemporary scholars. Henry Nelson Wieman has been ""contemporary"" almost half a century during which his has been one of the keenest minds representing American Liberal Theology. That his point of view has both strengths and weaknesses is quickly discerned by reading the three sections of the book, wherein first are heard those who have studied under him or worked alongside him at the Divinity School of the University of Chicago, and then the concurrent voices which admit his influence on them while yet having severe reservations. Then comes the third section wherein those who disagree, augment or otherwise modify radically his conclusions are heard. The book begins with a brief ""spiritual autobiography"" by Dr. Wieman, and then follow these critiques or expansions of his thoughts. The real beauty of the volume lies in the opportunity given Dr. Wieman to answer each of his proponents or opponents individually. Since the essays are written by men as widely divergent as Bernard Meland of the University of Chicago, Federated Theological Faculty and the Jesuit Gustave Wiegel of Maryland's Woodstock College, the result is a synoptic review of American Liberal theology. Thus the book is very valuable to all who are concerned with this development, and the only caution one would have to give potential buyers is the scholarly nature of the work. With no previous training in philosophy or theology a reader would be lost. For those with training to read it, the book will be either irritating or fascinating, depending on their anterior presuppositions. Either way, the volume is worth the time.

Pub Date: Feb. 1st, 1962
Publisher: Macmillan