THE OPIUM WAR IN CHINA, 1840-1842: The British Resort to War in Order to Maintain Their Opium Trade by Robin McKown

THE OPIUM WAR IN CHINA, 1840-1842: The British Resort to War in Order to Maintain Their Opium Trade

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A straightforward, fast-paced narrative of the events surrounding the opium war which sketches the dimensions of the opium problem in China (but without mentioning the existence of the habit in England itself), establishes opium's importnace in maintaining Britain's balance of trade, and enriches the account of Chinese-British confrontations with some striking character portraits -- notably of the puffy, red-faced envoy Lord Napier and Commissioner Lin, charged by the Emperor with the eradication of opium smuggling, who was a model of Confucian virtues and indefatigable energy but nevertheless helpless against British naval strength. Well written conventional history, with little interpretation beyond the summary judgment that the war is an example of imperialism, this is for the student with a special interest and/or paper assignment. Additional.

Pub Date: Sept. 1st, 1974
Page count: 72pp
Publisher: Franklin Watts