AN AMERICAN'S GUIDE TO BRITAIN by Robin Winks

AN AMERICAN'S GUIDE TO BRITAIN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Never fear: Mr. Winks won't lead you to the nearest McDonald's. He assumes you're one of those many Americans (like himself) who travel to Britain on the trail of Dickens and Hardy and Scott, yearn for a sight of the great cathedrals, and don't scorn Anglo-American associations--if a Signer's birthplace happens to be handy, that is. Cheerfully opinionated, he's prepared lists--annotated, of course--of the ten best cathedrals, castles, and country houses; provided tips on how to travel (and how not--by internal British airlines), where to stay, eat, and shop; and, best of all, devised motor tours of the various regions that cater to the aforementioned American proclivities. (No, you shouldn't be afraid to try driving ""on the wrong side of the road."") With each region comes advice on what to read in situ--in the Cotswolds, besides Malory, T. S. Eliot's ""Burnt Norton."" Regrettably, considerations of price and bulk prompted the omission of sections on Devon and Cornwall, and the Lake Country (as being all-too-well-known), and the Midlands and Northern Ireland (as appealing less to Americans); but a gazetteer at the book's close lists sights and scenes there too. A thoroughly agreeable volume--personal, imaginative, precise.

Pub Date: May 1st, 1977
Publisher: Scribners