THE BLUE FALCON by Robyn Carr

THE BLUE FALCON

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A medieval mulch-pile of romance/adventure clinkers featuring young Sir Conan de Corbney--who is about to return the love of the very young Lady Chandra when his evil mother Udele forces him to wed Chandra's frail (but land-rich) sister Edwina instead. And, meanwhile, evil Udele gives equally evil Sir Tedric secret bags of money to bribe him into marriage with Chandra--a foul wedlock which her father (dolt that he is) permits. Udele also pushes Edwina to her death, later gives orders to have her own daughter Edythe killed (because Edythe knows about Edwina's murder); Tedric, during Conan's 12th-century crusade absence in the Holy Land, laps up land and is filthy to poor Chandra and the people of her holdings. And so the evil goes--but eventually Conan comes home, is stunned by Chandra's beauty (""Her full breasts tempted the strength of her sheer kirtle""), sires her child in the forest, and rights all wrongs: Lady Udele goes up (literally) in smoke, and Tedric is speared by Conan while charging his own father. Like Carr's Chelynne (1980)--harmless (if longwinded) inanity, with a Sunday-funnies plot and style that may satisfy the least demanding sector of the costume-epic audience.

Pub Date: March 5th, 1981
Publisher: Little, Brown