A useful, inviting, and all-inclusive guide to eating disorders.

THE EATING DISORDER TRAP

A GUIDE FOR CLINICIANS AND LOVED ONES

A manual examines eating disorders and their treatments.

As Goldberg points out in her comprehensive new book, eating disorders are not only debilitating and dangerous, but also require expensive therapies and remain poorly explored in the medical field. She relates that current estimates reveal that eating disorders are either rising or being increasingly diagnosed, with the number of cases doubling “worldwide from 2013-2018 as compared to 2000-2006.” To begin her discussion on the disorders, the author first situates her topic in the broader landscape, reminding her readers that everybody needs fuel, and for some people, this simple requirement is infinitely complicated. “While many view eating as a recreational activity and a deserved pleasure,” she writes, “for some, it is seen as a scary experience and far from enjoyable.” Goldberg takes her readers through the basics, identifying the different types of eating disorders and their symptoms. The author then moves on to explain related issues, such as malnutrition and the strain it can place on the heart and many other organs and dehydration and its attendant complications. In short chapters appealingly illustrated by Baechle, Goldberg explains to her readers the anatomy, biology, and psychology of all aspects of eating disorders, simplifying and skillfully clarifying everything along the way. And refreshingly, all of this is presented in warm and supportive prose designed to give some encouragement to sufferers. “It is possible,” the author asserts, “to get out from under the thumb of an eating disorder or diet culture if only we become more educated in separating fact from fiction around the beliefs we learn from diet culture.” Readers who suffer from an eating disorder—or those who have loved ones who do—will find Goldberg’s book invaluable.

A useful, inviting, and all-inclusive guide to eating disorders.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: 978-1-63183-776-0

Page Count: 180

Publisher: BookLogix

Review Posted Online: April 23, 2020

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A conversational, pleasurable look into McConaughey’s life and thought.

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GREENLIGHTS

All right, all right, all right: The affable, laconic actor delivers a combination of memoir and self-help book.

“This is an approach book,” writes McConaughey, adding that it contains “philosophies that can be objectively understood, and if you choose, subjectively adopted, by either changing your reality, or changing how you see it. This is a playbook, based on adventures in my life.” Some of those philosophies come in the form of apothegms: “When you can design your own weather, blow in the breeze”; “Simplify, focus, conserve to liberate.” Others come in the form of sometimes rambling stories that never take the shortest route from point A to point B, as when he recounts a dream-spurred, challenging visit to the Malian musician Ali Farka Touré, who offered a significant lesson in how disagreement can be expressed politely and without rancor. Fans of McConaughey will enjoy his memories—which line up squarely with other accounts in Melissa Maerz’s recent oral history, Alright, Alright, Alright—of his debut in Richard Linklater’s Dazed and Confused, to which he contributed not just that signature phrase, but also a kind of too-cool-for-school hipness that dissolves a bit upon realizing that he’s an older guy on the prowl for teenage girls. McConaughey’s prep to settle into the role of Wooderson involved inhabiting the mind of a dude who digs cars, rock ’n’ roll, and “chicks,” and he ran with it, reminding readers that the film originally had only three scripted scenes for his character. The lesson: “Do one thing well, then another. Once, then once more.” It’s clear that the author is a thoughtful man, even an intellectual of sorts, though without the earnestness of Ethan Hawke or James Franco. Though some of the sentiments are greeting card–ish, this book is entertaining and full of good lessons.

A conversational, pleasurable look into McConaughey’s life and thought.

Pub Date: Oct. 20, 2020

ISBN: 978-0-593-13913-4

Page Count: 304

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: Oct. 27, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 2020

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Skloot's meticulous, riveting account strikes a humanistic balance between sociological history, venerable portraiture and...

THE IMMORTAL LIFE OF HENRIETTA LACKS

A dense, absorbing investigation into the medical community's exploitation of a dying woman and her family's struggle to salvage truth and dignity decades later.

In a well-paced, vibrant narrative, Popular Science contributor and Culture Dish blogger Skloot (Creative Writing/Univ. of Memphis) demonstrates that for every human cell put under a microscope, a complex life story is inexorably attached, to which doctors, researchers and laboratories have often been woefully insensitive and unaccountable. In 1951, Henrietta Lacks, an African-American mother of five, was diagnosed with what proved to be a fatal form of cervical cancer. At Johns Hopkins, the doctors harvested cells from her cervix without her permission and distributed them to labs around the globe, where they were multiplied and used for a diverse array of treatments. Known as HeLa cells, they became one of the world's most ubiquitous sources for medical research of everything from hormones, steroids and vitamins to gene mapping, in vitro fertilization, even the polio vaccine—all without the knowledge, must less consent, of the Lacks family. Skloot spent a decade interviewing every relative of Lacks she could find, excavating difficult memories and long-simmering outrage that had lay dormant since their loved one's sorrowful demise. Equal parts intimate biography and brutal clinical reportage, Skloot's graceful narrative adeptly navigates the wrenching Lack family recollections and the sobering, overarching realities of poverty and pre–civil-rights racism. The author's style is matched by a methodical scientific rigor and manifest expertise in the field.

Skloot's meticulous, riveting account strikes a humanistic balance between sociological history, venerable portraiture and Petri dish politics.

Pub Date: Feb. 9, 2010

ISBN: 978-1-4000-5217-2

Page Count: 320

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: Dec. 22, 2010

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 2010

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