OUT OF SILENCE INTO SOUND by Roger Burlingame

OUT OF SILENCE INTO SOUND

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The first chapter entitled ""The Great-Great Grandchildren"" and concerned with the development of the Telstar station in Andover, Maine is misleading. A history of sound beginning with the work of Bell and others and coming down to the phenomenal Telstar creation is expected; a mediocre biography of Bell is the actual content, not indicated by the title. The author has made only the sketchiest use of the vast amount of material which relates to his subject; he presents a skeleton biography of Alexander Bell as a boy in Edinburgh, with emphasis on his early interest in sound, inherited from father and grandfather; at various intervals, Burlingame interjects facts about other inventors and inventions prior to Bell. Although the author stresses that Bell's primary concern was teaching the deaf, he presents a much more detailed account of Bell's preoccupation with the telephone, thereby weakening his own case.

Publisher: Macmillan