ROGER CARAS' TREASURY OF GREAT DOG STORIES by Roger Caras

ROGER CARAS' TREASURY OF GREAT DOG STORIES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Thirty-one fictional dog stories collected by Caras, featuring works by such renowned authors as Mark Twain, Ray Bradbury, Arthur Clarke, Jack London, D.H. Lawrence. and Ivan Turgenev. On the whole, however, disappointing in contrast to its simultaneously published companion, Roger Caras' Treasury of Great Cat Stories (see preceding review). Surprisingly few of the pieces here are uplifting and heartwarming--the sort one would expect in this type of anthology. Those that do fall into this category include a dramatic Jack London story, ""For the Love of a Man"" (which details the intimate relationship that develops in the Yukon between a man and his devoted husky, Buck), a thought-provoking Lester Del Rey tale, ""The Faithful"" (a post-nuke survival saga in which dogs outlive man), and a charming Albert Payson Terhune tale, ""The Coming of Lad"" (the antics of a small but loyal and heroic watchdog). However, the number of gruesome, violent, or simply sad stories far outweighs the more upbeat contributions. Mark Twain's ""A Dog's Tale,"" for instance, recounts the story of a scientist who performs murderous experimentation on a puppy--the offspring of the very dog that once saved the scientist's young baby's life. And another humorless tale, Stephen Crane's ""A Dark-Brown Dog,"" tells of an alcoholic father who brutalizes and finally kills his small child's innocent pet. Generally gloomy, and only for the strong of stomach.

Pub Date: March 24th, 1987
Publisher: Dutton