MODELS OF THE CHURCH by

MODELS OF THE CHURCH

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The term ""models"" is used in the sense of ""aspects"" or ""dimensions"" manifested by the Church in its history or inherent in its mission: institutional, communion, sacramental, kerygmatic and servant. Each, as Dulles points out, has advantages and disadvantages, and each has adherents who despise all others. To partisans of the communion model, for example, the institutional form smacks of triumphalism and clericalism; proponents of the servant configuration find even the kerygmatic too ""churchy"" and introspective. The author's conclusion is that partisans of all five are both right and wrong; right in their conviction that one or another is necessary to the Church, but wrong in their belief that one alone is sufficient. The fact is, Dulles argues, that a balanced theology requires that the major affirmations of each model be incorporated into the structure of the Church. The book marks a new departure in comparative ecclesiology which will be important to theologians of all Christian churches, but the subject is too ""special"" and Dulles' style too opaque for the book to have an audience beyond that.

Pub Date: March 22nd, 1974
Publisher: Doubleday