THE EARLY ALPINE GUIDES by Ronald Clark

THE EARLY ALPINE GUIDES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A painstaking and very British account of the birth of a fabulous and hazardous profession, told in terms of the great personalities who established the standards of, honor and responsibility as well as courage now implicit in the title of Guide. There are carefully documented accounts of the exploits and character of such famous guides as Christian Almer, Croz, Anderegg, Carrel, along with those pioneers who established mountaineering as a science and great amateur sport, rather than a freak interest of madmen. Once the almost archaic style is accepted, much of the substance is engrossing, tinged with the excitement of men who ""guided"" where they themselves had never been, earning the status of friends rather than employees. The book has an introduction by the past president of the Alpine Club, Lord Schuster, -and is liberally illustrated with reproductions of engravings from Whymper's Scrambles Amongst the Alps, photographs, maps; and augmented with appendices containing biographical notes on amateur climbers, a table of principal ascents, a good Bibliography and an index.

Publisher: Scribner