GEORGE WASHINGTON SEPTEMBER, SIR! by Ronald Harwood

GEORGE WASHINGTON SEPTEMBER, SIR!

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A white woman complains to the police and George Washington September's troubles start. A Zulu, an ""educated native"" with his standard five, whose uncle, Kalanga, has his ""matric"", George is happy and proud of his job with the Finbergs, has absorbed from their 19 year old son Abel some ideas of right and wrong, and begins, with his ""big trouble"", to consider what life is like for a non-European in Capetown. He is the innocent fall guy for one Jannie Griqua's need to ingratiate himself with the local police; through Griqua's manipulations he is the means of his uncle's being jailed; and, in his own awakening to the widening areas in which he has been an unwilling agent, he comes to the knowledge that and killing are not the ways in which a black man can deal with the whites. The laws that restrict the non-Europeans --and how they are circumvented by those same people, the type of life they live and the way they talk give this an immediate touch and feel that reflects, in a first novel, much of Lytton's The White Man (Simon & Schuster, P. 24) in a compulsive fashion.

Pub Date: Aug. 24th, 1961
Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Cudahy