THE LOOK OF THE GREEN MAN by Ronald Johnson
Kirkus Star

THE LOOK OF THE GREEN MAN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A single theme runs green and alive through these exultant poems: the landscape of England, seen through its myths, artists, poets, naturalists, and all fused into the author's present vivid vision. ""The Green Man"" is an ancient, and widespread, spirit of Vegetation: and, like him, these poems proliferate with quotations from Chaucer, Wordsworth, Whitman, and a host of poets ancient and modern, with enchanted place-names, lists of trees, minerals or shining creatures--""The Beetle...flashing Mackerel...humming-birds...Fog-bow & Moon-bow...Mirage & iridescence""--with descriptions of a ""Stonehenge made of living trees,"" with prose passages by Gilbert White, Thoreau, etc. This dazzling wealth of material is equalled by the splendor and sense of wonder in the poetry itself. Descriptions and impressions rush headlong, luminous, full of colors, clouds, birds, air, and a sense of great heights and distances. The fantastic, in nature and art, is interwoven with, and heightens, a feeling of the miraculous in ""earthworm & mole & turtle,... BOOKS, BOOKS,"" wheatfields, reapers, thatched barns...a world palpable, transformed, by a heightened awareness.

Publisher: Norton