SECRET SERVANTS: A HISTORY OF JAPANESE ESPIONAGE by Ronald Seth

SECRET SERVANTS: A HISTORY OF JAPANESE ESPIONAGE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

From accredited sources, many of them Japanese documents recently made available, this integrates the story of Japanese espionage, a talent native to this people, along with the techniques and tactics used over the last hundred years. Based on the system inaugurated in Germany by Wilhelm Stieber, Bismarck's great spymaster who developed a secret police force which operated on an international as well as national basis, Japan also added the patriotic society as a means, sex as a weapon. With world domination in view, their greatest success was at Port Arthur in 1904; later, under Doihara, called the Lawrence of Manchuria, they achieved infiltration there; and with the '30's, began their assault against the Americas- achieved largely through the flux of fishing boats. Pearl Harbor, of course, caps and writes a temporary conclusion to this history.... A calm handling of material which could be open to sensationalism- and a popular overall.

Pub Date: July 15th, 1957
Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Cudahy