CHAMPLAIN OF THE ST. LAWRENCE by Ronald Syme
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CHAMPLAIN OF THE ST. LAWRENCE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Third in an excellent series of biographies dealing with great explorers. While this hasn't quite the sense of discovery of Bay of the North (the Radisson story) nor the color and drama of Cortes of Mexico, it is still far above the average level attained by books of this type. One senses thorough grounding in source material, and the author has successfully used- as integral to the text- some of Champlain's own writings of his adventures. As one follows his story, and realizes that he was the founder of Quebec, of Montreal; that Lake Champlain bears his name, and he- first probably among white men, saw the Great Lakes; that he played an important part in the establishment of colonies in Nova Scotia, and in other parts of New France, the significance of his contribution comes home vigorously. This is a somewhat younger approach than the two earlier books. While it still will appeal largely to the twelve to fourteens, it could also be read by mature ten and eleven year olds.

Pub Date: March 19th, 1952
Publisher: Morrow