A HISTORIAN'S PROGRESS by Roy F. Nichols

A HISTORIAN'S PROGRESS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

After an eminently fruitful lifetime spent in the field of American political history, Professor Nichols proves that he is also a master of an almost forgotten art form, the intellectual biography. The book is, in effect, the story of ""a historian's progress"" from his discovery of history at the age of three to his retirement (from the University of Pennsylvania) in 1966. It is also the summing up of his ideas on the nature and meaning of history and a historical progress whose basic force he conceives as a sum total of ""individual determinisms which vary all the way from complete disorganization to highly concentrated personal mobilization of the resources of personality."" It is a story and a reflection recounted with that total lack of pomposity and pretense that has characterized the author's sixteen major works and his innumerable contributions to collections and journals, and the book will, despite its rather ""special"" nature, exercise its charm on the general reader as well as on the wide circle of Professor Nichols' friends, admirers, and disciples.

Pub Date: May 13th, 1968
Publisher: Knopf