CHURCHILL'S LAST YEARS by Roy Howells

CHURCHILL'S LAST YEARS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

The greatest Englishman of all time never drank tea. He took champagne with his meals and brandy after. He loved hats and children and pets, the cinema (his favorite stars were Garbo, Dietrich, Bergman) and of course, cigars. The ""Karsh look"" was achieved by the photographer's tugging the cigar from his mouth just before taking the picture. He became the most long-lived Prime Minister in England's history, a citizen of the United States and a member of the American Indian nation. On his fiftieth wedding anniversary his family gave him a rose garden which was planted between the strawberries and the cabbages; on his ninetieth birthday a card sent to ""The Greatest Man Alice W.S.C. London"" reached him. This is the man whom Roy Howells first met in his study at Chartwell, at the age of eighty-three, ""wearing glasses and drinking brandy and soda,"" and to whom he bid farewell seven years later with the parting thought, expressed to all, ""What a very great man he was."" Sir Winston never got his nurse and companion's name right (he called him ""Howes""), but Roy Howells has called Sir Winston very right indeed, with an admirable blend of respect and perception, reserve and revelation. It is a kind, caring, considerate portrait not without humor, and it will further serve to humanize further that most human being.

Publisher: McKay