THE COMPLETE BOOK OF CAVE EXPLORATION by Roy Pinney

THE COMPLETE BOOK OF CAVE EXPLORATION

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KIRKUS REVIEW

ves provided man with his earliest shelter. They are favorite haunts for both the young and old. And their mysteries have been a continuing challenge to scientists and explorers. During the last 50 years our knowledge of caves has enormously increased. Here is an authoritative account of caves and caving by Roy Pinney, naturalist, entomologist and spelunker, not the first nor the last. The book begins with a discussion of the origins of caves and of the processes at work in their formation that is both precise and factual. These introductory chapters which fix caves for the reader as a physical and geological pheonomean are followed by chapters covering a range of subjects: cave forms, cave fauna (animal and plant life), archaeological finds (such as cave art, bone caves, and the Dead Sea Scrolls), famous explorations and rescues, and great discoveries. But the heart of the book lies in the author's description of the important caves of the world and of their role in history (for example, Operation X Ray, performed at Ney Cave, was carried out during the war to train bats to carry incendiary bombs to strategic cities in Japan); and in a rather shorter section devoted to the sport of spelunking. But this over-simple summary cannot describe the book's interest and erudition; Mr. Pinney ranges too widely for that. Thus he discusses scientific methods for determining the age of artifacts, safety factors of caving, underwater archaeology, cave photography, and cave engineering. He has, in fact, written a scholarly study in a popular style about one of nature's most exciting creations. Recommended to the intelligent layman, student of science, and to all readers who enjoy factual accounts of adventure.

Pub Date: Oct. 19th, 1962
Publisher: Coward-McCann