WASHINGTON: MAGNIFICENT CAPITAL by

WASHINGTON: MAGNIFICENT CAPITAL

By
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KIRKUS REVIEW

Washington envisioned it as a commercial city; Dickens viewed it as ""a city of magnificent intentions""; Maroon, Smith and Sevareid see it as the ""most handsome and powerful of American cities,"" ""virtuous and bland."" Their book covers not only the city proper but its environs and extensions in Virginia and Maryland; not only the physical city but its people and the life they live there, from the White House to the Negro slums. The activities and functions of the President, Congress, the Supreme Court, Embassy Row, the Pentagon, the press, the lobbyists, society are described along with the places in which they dwell. On to Georgetown, Foggy Bottom, Lafayette Square, Pennsylvania Avenue, Mount Vernon and Manassas, Chevy Chase, etc. with a chapter devoted to the Negro in Washington. The pictures have not been seen here; like the city, the text is virtuous and bland enough for a predominantly pictorial presentation.

Pub Date: Dec. 3rd, 1965
Publisher: Doubleday