THE UNITED STATES AND WORLD WAR II by Russell A. Buchanan

THE UNITED STATES AND WORLD WAR II

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Since the author of this two-volume walrus had obviously no intention of entertaining anyone, to say, as far as style goes, that it's about as bland as playing with kiddie blocks, is somewhat irrelevant. What the book sets out to do is record the changing shape of American history during WWII, and to do it by consulting at least 100 other serious semiofficial monographs, private papers, foreign documents and dry-as-dust what-not. Thus the sensibility gets skimped, but the information trickles down every which way and keeps building till what a reservoir, what a resume! Even here selection shapes up: the Pacific and European theatres are in the forefront, diplomatic hanky-panky is somewhere midway, and far off towards the rear hobnob the folks back home. The interpretations are generally genteel, the coverage large and limber. Highlights: the Atlantic Charter and leadership clashes; the Guadalcanal and Iwo campaigns; D-Day, the Bulge, and Nazi puting (all three tops); the Yalta chess game. A reference must.

Publisher: Harper & Row