THE PROUD AMERICAN BOY by Russell Braddon

THE PROUD AMERICAN BOY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Russell Braddon's first. (?) novel is occasionally swamped by some overwritten scenes, and it makes fictional use of the shocking incident some years ago when a Negro boy of eight was tried and convicted in the South for ""molesting"" a white female of the same age. In fact, it seems, they exchanged a kiss. The book is well along and involved with Roy Jackson, his family and way of life, before learning that they are Negro. The Impact of this revelation is effectively and honestly written. Much of the balance of the book dramatizes the social economic-political aspects of the case, through many different factious: the KKK, NAACP. the press, the local politicians (a governor, a senator), the prominent Negroes who want no part of it, and ordinary people- both black and white. Only at the end, when Roy's fate is determined, does the closing section movingly suggest the answer to brotherhood.... In spite of literary reservations, a worthwhile book.

Pub Date: Oct. 4th, 1961
Publisher: St Martin's Press