A BOOK OF ENCHANTMENTS AND CURSES by Ruth-Ed. Manning-Sanders

A BOOK OF ENCHANTMENTS AND CURSES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Who but Manning-Sanders can turn up so many old tales (fifteen collections so far) without approaching the bottom of the barrel? The thirteen stories here assembled deal with enchantment, which is the essence of fairy lore and a broad enough theme to allow for a satisfying proportion of adventure, romance, and humor. Entries range from a brisk anecdote from Africa about a girl who takes the form of a pick handle to escape cannibals to the more substantial ""Vasilissa Most Lovely"" (a fluent, involving version) and the empathic ""Peter,"" about an ordinary lad tapped for high deeds. Then there's a deposed prince who concludes, when he marries a distant princess and inherits her father's realm, ""Though I once had a kingdom of my own, which my stepmother stole from me--well she can keep it."" A typical, hang-loose Manning-Sanders touch, and one reason why we find her perpetually refreshing.

Pub Date: June 10th, 1977
Publisher: Dutton