PEOPLE OF THE FIRST CITIES by Ruth Goode

PEOPLE OF THE FIRST CITIES

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KIRKUS REVIEW

A simple but businesslike survey, in the usual textbook order, of ancient civilizations from ""the first city people,"" the Sumerians, on through the Achaeons or ""first Greeks""--and ending with the various farming peoples (up to the Teutonic tribes, the ""last newcomers from the East"") who slowly moved across to Western Europe. Salient characteristics and developments are noted--pyramids, tombs and Pharaohs for Egypt, palaces and bulls in Crete--and contributions (calendar, alphabet, monotheism) cited. Goode briefly summarizes the stories of Theseus and the Iliad and Odyssey and comments on the likely and possible truth behind them. However, the ""city"" angle--i.e. effects of urbanization on life and history--is not really considered, nor does Goode attempt a closeup profile of ""the people."" Fleet and streamlined next to Greene's Man and Ancient Civilization (p. 993, J-249), this smoothly written sequel to People of the Ice Age (1973) is handily arranged to provide an orienting introduction or clarifying review of the subject.

Pub Date: Oct. 31st, 1977
Publisher: Macmillan