COME BACK ON TUESDAY by Ruth Hunter

COME BACK ON TUESDAY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Real stuff of actual theatrical experience -- must reading for stagestruck hopefuls -- in the story told by one young actress whose will to act kept her going despite the obstacles. Here is the story of those thousands of youngsters who love -- and hate -- the theatre because of the heartbreaking ups and downs. It is story too of a haywire life that the Main Stem chase for opportunity gives rise to. The author's experiences in vaudeville, touring, getting a start on Broadway, finding that ""Come back on Tuesday"" meant exactly nothing. There's the boredom of understudying, the thrill of creating a part, only to lose it, the combatting of managers and producers, the contacts with others all bent on following the same route -- and behind it a determination to be a good wife at the same time and not lose her sense of values in theatre. The high moments too often blot out the low, but she ultimately finds a niche in the part of Ellie May in Tobacco Road and a vindication of years of squirrel cage activity. Authentic feel not hurt by occasional bursts of hysterical volubility.

Pub Date: March 12th, 1945
Publisher: Scribner