OUT OF THE SALTBOX by Ruth M.

OUT OF THE SALTBOX

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Miss Rasey writes sentimentally of five generations of her family who lived at Windy Summit, a staunch old saltbox house on Rupert Mountain in Vermont. The house itself, the dooryard and its medicinal herbs, the barn -- twice burned, and most recently rebuilt by the painter, John Little -- the meadow, the spring and well, pasture and birch grove are the scenes of family joys, sorrows ambitions and accidents. She tells of paring and husking bees, the advent of Rural Free Delivery and the labors of the mail carrier beyond the call of duty, of threshing days when boys and girls stayed home from school to help in barn and kitchen, of recipes for old family remedies and for succulent foodstuffs of every description (""man is a better citizen when well fed""). Accounts of events at town hall and meeting house are full of historical data. A note of somewhat naive humor enters when she describes an old-fashioned coffee break for field-stranded wood choppers: ""a mid-forenoon lunch of doughnuts and new cider"", delivered on the spot. The doings at smithy, mill, cheese factory, sap house (""clean and quick""), proved to these pioneers that ""men become united when they work together to produce what is good for them all"".

Pub Date: Oct. 22nd, 1962
Publisher: Rand McNally