HELPING YOUR CHILD IMPROVE HIS READING by Ruth Strang

HELPING YOUR CHILD IMPROVE HIS READING

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Hypothesizing that helping a child learn to read is a joint responsibility of the home and the school, Miss Strang covers every conceivable aspect of the reading situation from pre school to junior high school level. Although parents should not initiate a pedagogic process, or in any way contradict the teacher's approach to her subject and thus complete for the learner's allegiance, there are ways that a parent can help with and through reading development. Familiarize yourself with the way in which the child is being taught. Help him with his home practice exercises. Introduce him to exciting, meaningful books that will engage and interest him. ""If he feels that they are spending the time to help him with his reading because they love him and want him to be happy he will usually respond to whatever method they use."" If Miss Strang seems awfully non-commital on the subjects of phonic vs sight reading, the Johany Ivan controversy, and the exact degree to which parents should reader assistance, this is indeed justified by the scantiness of the evidence with which she has to work and the extremely individual nature of the children in question. There are many direct quotes from the themselves, introspective analyses of how they were taught to read and their attitudes towards parental tutoring. Included is an extensive, thirty page of reading materials for the child, books on reading development for the parent. Simplified, somewhat repetitive, but comprehensive. Anxious mothers buy books.

Pub Date: March 14th, 1962
Publisher: Dutton