NEW HOPE by Ruth Suckow

NEW HOPE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Ones again Ruth Suckow proves that she knows the inner workings of a small town of the middle west (Minnesota, on the Dakota line). But unlike The Folks, her best book, this new story falls into the error of allowing atmosphere and minutiae to overbalance the interplay of characters -- the development of theme. The story spans the two years tenancy of a young minister, his charming wife and winsome small daughter. Through their contact with their parishioners, and through the tutelage of the Dave Millers, one builds an intimate picture of the community, a little new town, with outlying prairie countryside, with a pattern of birth and death, love and hate, courting and marriage, thwarted hopes and fears. Most of the action -- such as it is-- one sees through the eyes of little Delight and eight year old Clarence Miller -- and Ruth Suckow knows her children. A charming fabric without much design.

Pub Date: Feb. 23rd, 1942
Publisher: Farrar & Rinehart