Going to school doesn’t mean leaving childhood behind; stuffed lovies have a place still.

BEAR'S BIG DAY

Bear may be big enough for school, but that doesn’t mean he has to do everything by himself now.

Bear is excited and proud to be going to school for the first time. He has a big-bear backpack with pockets for each of his school supplies: his lunchbox, glue, pencil case, and crayons. But there’s no place for Floppy, his stuffed bunny. Readers with their own beloved stuffies will intuitively sense what the story’s problem will be from Bear’s sad glance back at Floppy, who is sitting propped up on Bear’s windowsill. Sure enough, “something—or someone—was missing,” and Bear doesn’t color or eat snack or nap with his classmates. Miss Fox notices and asks what the matter is. Bear figures he’s just not ready for school yet, but she tells him that “even big teachers need help sometimes.” Together, they use craft supplies to fashion a pocket for Floppy, and Bear enjoys the second day doing big-bear things with Floppy securely in his backpack (alongside the stuffed pals of Bear’s classmates). Yoon’s digital illustrations use bold black lines, simple shapes, and bright colors to focus attention on the characters, and Bear’s feelings are evident. His classmates include a lamb, a moose, and a panda (who eats snack with chopsticks).

Going to school doesn’t mean leaving childhood behind; stuffed lovies have a place still. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: June 21, 2016

ISBN: 978-0-8027-3832-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Bloomsbury

Review Posted Online: May 4, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 2016

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Uplifting and inspiring of further research.

SEÑORITA MARIPOSA

A bilingual love poem of admiration and respect for the millions of monarch butterflies that journey south to Mexico every year.

From a chrysalis on the title page, Señorita Mariposa invites readers to follow the monarch butterfly as it embarks on a journey spanning thousands of miles, “Over mountains capped with snow… / To the deserts down below.” In the same manner, the monarch butterfly exiting the chrysalis at the end of the book then invites readers to flip back to the beginning and restart the journey. Almada Rivero’s warm and friendly illustrations showcase the various people and animals the monarch encounters in its 3,000-mile journey, including a couple of brown-skinned children who welcome Señorita Mariposa to Mexico as the text reads, “Can’t believe how far you’ve come.” Gundersheimer’s recounting of the lepidoptera’s journey is told in a bilingual poem, English set in a serif type and Spanish set in sans-serif. Like the butterfly traveling south and north, the languages switch prominence, displaying in the larger font the principal—and rhyming—language in each spread. Although at times distracting, this technique is a valiant attempt to give equal importance to each language. Backmatter includes facts on the round trip the butterflies undertake, the “super generation” that makes the trek south, and a call to action to protect the monarchs as they slowly lose their habitats.

Uplifting and inspiring of further research. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Aug. 6, 2019

ISBN: 978-1-5247-4070-2

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Nancy Paulsen Books

Review Posted Online: May 26, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2019

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Who ya gonna call? A different snowplow book.

SCOOPER AND DUMPER

Friends don’t let friends expire in snowdrifts.

Convoluted storytelling and confusing art turn a cute premise into a mishmash of a book. Scooper’s a front loader that works in the town salt yard, replenishing the snowplows that arrive. Dumper’s her best friend, more than happy to plow and salt the roads himself. When the big city calls in Dumper to help with a snow squall, he brushes off Scooper’s concerns. Yet slippery roads and a seven-vehicle pileup launch poor Dumper onto his side in a snowbank. Can Scooper overcome fears that she’s too slow and save the day? Following a plot as succinct as this should be a breeze, but the rhyming text obfuscates more than it clarifies. Lines such as, “Dumper’s here— / let’s rock ’n’ roll! / Big city’s callin’ for / some small-town soul” can prove impenetrable. The art of the book matches this confusion, with light-blue Dumper often hard to pick out among other, similarly colored vehicles, particularly in the snowstorm. Speech bubbles, as when the city calls for Scooper’s and Dumper’s help, lead to a great deal of visual confusion. Scooper is also featured sporting long eyelashes and a bow, lest anyone mistake the dithering, frightened truck as anything but female. (This book was reviewed digitally with 11-by-17-inch double-page spreads viewed at 16.8% of actual size.)

Who ya gonna call? A different snowplow book. (Picture book. 3-6)

Pub Date: Nov. 17, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-5420-9268-5

Page Count: 40

Publisher: Two Lions

Review Posted Online: Sept. 15, 2020

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 2020

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