THE PROGRESSIVE FARMER'S SOUTHERN COOKBOOK by Sallie-Ed. Hill

THE PROGRESSIVE FARMER'S SOUTHERN COOKBOOK

By
Email this review

KIRKUS REVIEW

With Marion Brown's Southern Cookbook (Univ. of S.C.) as a standby and Marion Flexner's Dixie Dishes and Out of Kentucky Kitchens for gourmet dishes, the claim that this is ""the largest and most complete Southern Cookbook on the market"" seems a little excessive. But it is an excellent cookbook, with considerable- but not over-stressed-regional flavor, sound basic recipes ranging from beverages through the prescribed courses, to snacks and party foods, and with a number of special features to distinguish it from the run of the mill southern cookery books (of which there are many). For the average housewife, who wants to vary her menus with regional dishes, the inclusion of such Southern specialties as hush puppies, crackling bread, all styles of cornbread, gumbos, burgoos, Brunswick stew, chess pie, shoo-fly pie, stack cake, Lady, and Lord Baltimore cakes and many other items will be welcome indeed. The absence of any recipes calling for wine or spirits should be noted. For some this will be an asset; for others, a liability. For this reader, the book's chief value lies in the special hints:-keys to cake baking failures, advice on making pies, jelly-making hints, substitutes, and the how-to-do-it section. Two editions- the de luxe edition has colored end papers and is boxed; both have numerous line drawings.

Pub Date: May 31st, 1961
Publisher: Putnam