A highly provocative, if one-sided, perspective not often heard in mainstream discourse.

READ REVIEW

Future of the Middle East - United Pan-Arab States

A prolonged diatribe depicting Israel and the Jews as the greatest obstacles to peace in the Middle East and to the inevitable emergence of stabilized, united Arab states.

Cohen is beyond outspoken in this book that is far more about Jews than Arabs. His indictment of Israel as a nuclear bully and criminal oppressor of the Palestinians—willingly abetted by a United States controlled by influential American Jews—crosses over into denunciation. “The rest of the world is correct to view these two rogue governments as direct threats to life on earth,” he writes. He depicts Jews as a tiny, ultra-privileged demographic of self-serving believers in their own superiority and as a people with no empathy for the non-Jewish majority. In Cohen’s view, American soldiers fought and died in Iraq and Afghanistan protecting the interests of Israel, not of their own country. “It is a totally new world being managed by corporations rather than governments,” he writes. “Jews control most of these corporations. This means that everything will be tilted in favor of Israel and its security and future in the Middle East.” Jewish control of the media and the culture, he says, assures these realities will be seen as unfit for public discussion. The author’s preoccupation with these themes overshadows his prediction of a new Arab coalition of still Islamic but modernized states, with Iran included and Israel withered away to nothing. “There is no place in the Middle East for a Jewish state,” he writes. “From almost all perspectives, Israel is an unnatural implant in the Middle East.” Jews, he says, would do better as they always have, living in other countries, including those with Islamic majorities. And as American influence in the region wanes, they may have no other choice. In his bombastic style, Cohen scrupulously provides examples and references for all he asserts. He provides no biography and avoids revealing any personal information. Is he himself Jewish? He doesn’t say, though he does seem to suggest that only Jews dare speak the truth about Jews.

A highly provocative, if one-sided, perspective not often heard in mainstream discourse.

Pub Date: Aug. 27, 2014

ISBN: 978-1496934949

Page Count: 452

Publisher: AuthorHouse

Review Posted Online: Feb. 16, 2015

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

Did you like this book?

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

SEVERAL SHORT SENTENCES ABOUT WRITING

New York Times columnist and editorial board member delivers a slim book for aspiring writers, offering saws and sense, wisdom and waggery, biases and biting sarcasm.

Klinkenborg (Timothy; or, Notes of an Abject Reptile, 2006), who’s taught for decades, endeavors to keep things simple in his prose, and he urges other writers to do the same. (Note: He despises abuses of the word as, as he continually reminds readers.) In the early sections, the author ignores traditional paragraphing so that the text resembles a long free-verse poem. He urges readers to use short, clear sentences and to make sure each one is healthy before moving on; notes that it’s acceptable to start sentences with and and but; sees benefits in diagramming sentences; stresses that all writing is revision; periodically blasts the formulaic writing that many (most?) students learn in school; argues that knowing where you’re headed before you begin might be good for a vacation, but not for a piece of writing; and believes that writers must trust readers more, and trust themselves. Most of Klinkenborg’s advice is neither radical nor especially profound (“Turn to the poets. / Learn from them”), and the text suffers from a corrosive fallacy: that if his strategies work for him they will work for all. The final fifth of the text includes some passages from writers he admires (McPhee, Oates, Cheever) and some of his students’ awkward sentences, which he treats analytically but sometimes with a surprising sarcasm that veers near meanness. He includes examples of students’ dangling modifiers, malapropisms, errors of pronoun agreement, wordiness and other mistakes.

Analyzing his craft, a careful craftsman urges with Thoreauvian conviction that writers should simplify, simplify, simplify.

Pub Date: Aug. 7, 2012

ISBN: 978-0-307-26634-7

Page Count: 224

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: May 14, 2012

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 2012

Did you like this book?

No Comments Yet
more