ALEUTIANS, GILBERTS AND MARSHALLS by Samuel Eliot Morison

ALEUTIANS, GILBERTS AND MARSHALLS

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KIRKUS REVIEW

By process of deduction this seems to be Vol. VII of the memorable History of U S Naval Operations in World War II. It is extraordinary how well the interest holds up (even on the part of a layman), and how vigorous a sense of drama and immediacy Morison- and his associates- have been able to convey in telling what is now more than a twice told tale. Chronologically this follows Volume IV, which parallels operations in the South and Southwest Pacific. The focus is specifically on amphibious operations and carrier warfare, both of which advanced the art of war in such campaigns as Tarawa, the Komandorski Islands, and particularly the whole pattern of the Micronesian operations (the Gilberts, Marshalls, Carolines and Marianas). Logistics are extensively explored, mistakes analyzed, though he takes issue with General Holland Smith's claim that we could have skipped the Gilberts and their costliness. Morison feels that the importance of the Marine performance at Tarawa and Betio made the relatively easier Kwajalein campaign possible, and the subsequent pushover at Truk. ""The Marshalls cracked the Japanese shell"". This is that story.

Publisher: Little, Brown-AMP