PSYCHIC CHILDREN by Samuel H. Young

PSYCHIC CHILDREN

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Jenny sends telepathic messages through Manhattan and turned down The Role in The Exorcist; Monica heals miraculously via blessed water while Ray's magic mixture--Solium Bergolium--consists of Halo shampoo, water, and food coloring; Conchita had regular contact with Our Lady who made the twelve-year-old spit out her chewing gum before kissing the holy rosary. Apparently psychic children have about the same batting average--and commercial draw--as adults like Uri Geller, and Young is leading their cheering section. Although he admits than many of these phenomena, upon close examination, turn out to be imaginary or cleverly manipulated, there are others (involving ESP, PK, OOBE, premonitions, visions) that defy explanation and natural laws. True enough, but his slippery certainties and dubious narratives won't win over the skeptics. Instead of concentrating on the research done at institutions like Stanford, research which can be replicated, Young uses the testimony of those overeager believers whose reliability is open to question. Unfortunately, in nearly all of these rather spectacular cases, there's little that's convincing and much room for doubt: too often that luminescence seems to belong to a film crew. Now you know what we're thinking.

Pub Date: April 8th, 1977
Publisher: Doubleday