FOXHUNTING IS DIFFERENT by Samuel J. Henry

FOXHUNTING IS DIFFERENT

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KIRKUS REVIEW

And Mr. Henry tells as neatly as it is possible to put the intangible into words why and how it is different. What it is and more important, what it isn't -- all this and more for the tells something of its lore and much of its legends, tales of Maryland, Virginia and Kentucky filled with the famous horse and hound lovers of the South, and he doesn't stop at the organized hunt and turn up his nose at the Fox Race, the Bugle Ann kind of running so little known outside the South. Explain to your customers its quaintness and charm which you will find undeniable after reading the book's explanation and old Uncle Mose. In fact to the uninitiated you can make it sound a lot more attractive than it often seems when first experienced. We have had many a weekend guest appear red-eyed at Monday breakfast and frankly ask why with four hundred acres to run on that d-- fox had to spend three nights circumventing the house, garden, orchard and woods? Why we enjoyed being kept awake, let alone nearly died of excitement as the race waxed hot and the pace increased? And why, what, to them sounded like yelps and howls, should be music to our ears? Many of these scoffers have returned and learned to love it as we do, to listen for familiar voices till sunrise and let old Morpheus vainly blow his horn. Paul Brown has 26 full pages of his inimitable brush and ink vignettes so every Brown enthusiast and collector is a sure-fire sale. Bound in hunting scarlet.

Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1938
Publisher: Derrydale