MARGUERITE OF NAVARRE by Samuel Putnam
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MARGUERITE OF NAVARRE

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KIRKUS REVIEW

To all whose appetite was whetted for more of the same after reading Francis the First, here's the distaff side of the picture. The sister of Francis, to whom he was sun and moon and stars. Evidence even indicates there may have been an incestuous relation there -- and Putnam weighs the pros and cons seriously. Aside from that, the approach is very like that of Hackett, with fresh source material to tap in Marguerite's own writings, the Heptameron and her poetry. A more sympathetic picture of the mother, Louise, than Hackett drew -- and possibly a less sympathetic one of Francis, though his charm and popularity and glamour are all there. Marguerite was a constructive factor in the intellectual life of her day -- she fought the battles of tolerance and breadth of vision, until she was charged with betrayal of the church in which she had been reared. Somehow the book doesn't quite come off. It leaves one with a feeling of not quite digested notes. None the less, it is interesting -- and the Hackett book has piled up big sales.

Pub Date: Oct. 17th, 1935
Publisher: Coward, McCann