WILLIAM HEARD KILPATRICK by Samuel Tenenbaum

WILLIAM HEARD KILPATRICK

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KIRKUS REVIEW

No more controversial figure than William Heard Kilpatrick exists in the world of education today, unless it is that of his precursor and colleague, John Dewey, who contributes an introduction here. Both of them have been recently persecuted for their radical ideas, and Kilpatrick was a factor in the Pasadena case. This biography, written by a student and warm admirer of Professor Kilpatrick, sets forth his life and ideas in terms of warm praise and belief. Kilpatrick's chief contribution to the progressive education movement was his ""project method"", and he believed the child's whole personality should be enthusiastically engaged in purposive activities, and that repetitive book learning, examinations, and sterile memory work on mental discipline subjects were futile. Active, sager, optimistic, extroverted, democratic, a follower of the pragmatism of William James and John Dewey, Kilpatrick is a firm believer in the perfectibility of human nature. The main part of his life was spent as a most influential professor at Columbia University's Teachers' College, and he was later instrumental in founding Bennington College. But today, while progressive education is under active attack by patriotic societies, the Legion, and numerous religious groups, Kilpatrick is also a figure of criticism. While for educators, intellectuals, liberals, his story here will command a definite and specific audience.

Publisher: Harper