A handy reference that addresses the detection and treatment of common diseases and disorders.

THE INCREDIBLE HUMAN MACHINE, VOLUME 1

YOUR BODY AND ITS HEALTH

The first in a two-volume health care guide for both laypersons and health care workers.

Veluchamy brings over 30 years’ experience in medical research and patient-care services to this easy-to-read work, which is both an at-home guide to health and wellness and a clinical reference manual. The first volume discusses a host of topics, including the doctor-patient relationship, patient safety, diagnostic tests and preventive wellness care. It’s particularly designed to provide health care information to readers in developing countries in the Asia-Pacific region, where chronic diseases have eclipsed infectious diseases as the leading causes of death. Still, the manual is general enough for a worldwide audience. Part 1 of this book looks at risk factors for chronic ailments, informed consent and patient rights, common medical errors and when to get a second opinion. The author includes stories about his own patients, which illustrate his points and make the guide more instructive. For example, as he discusses the case of a surgical patient, he offers a questionnaire to help patients determine whether they’re strong enough to undergo surgery. In this section, there’s also a useful table of screening tests for a variety of diseases, with recommended intervals. In Part 2, Veluchamy covers preventive care and wellness initiatives, with special sections on the health needs of children and the elderly. The subchapter “Healthy Aging” is particularly helpful, as it addresses the changes one may expect during the natural aging process. Part 3 specifically tackles chronic diseases, including heart and vascular issues, cerebrovascular disorders, diabetes, and respiratory and kidney ailments. Drawings, photos and tables in each chapter will help readers understand the material, and the text is amply footnoted with explanations and cross-references to other chapters. Overall, the book will be easily accessible for nonexperts, as it’s generally free of medical jargon. Although the guide could benefit from a topical index, its table of contents is detailed and well-organized, allowing readers the chance to explore hundreds of subjects.

A handy reference that addresses the detection and treatment of common diseases and disorders.

Pub Date: July 15, 2014

ISBN: 978-1493712458

Page Count: 320

Publisher: CreateSpace

Review Posted Online: Nov. 11, 2014

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Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis...

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE

50TH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

Privately published by Strunk of Cornell in 1918 and revised by his student E. B. White in 1959, that "little book" is back again with more White updatings.

Stricter than, say, Bergen Evans or W3 ("disinterested" means impartial — period), Strunk is in the last analysis (whoops — "A bankrupt expression") a unique guide (which means "without like or equal").

Pub Date: May 15, 1972

ISBN: 0205632645

Page Count: 105

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: Oct. 28, 2011

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1972

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A brief but sometimes knotty and earnest set of studies best suited for Shakespeare enthusiasts.

THIS IS SHAKESPEARE

A brisk study of 20 of the Bard’s plays, focused on stripping off four centuries of overcooked analysis and tangled reinterpretations.

“I don’t really care what he might have meant, nor should you,” writes Smith (Shakespeare Studies/Oxford Univ.; Shakespeare’s First Folio: Four Centuries of an Iconic Book, 2016, etc.) in the introduction to this collection. Noting the “gappy” quality of many of his plays—i.e., the dearth of stage directions, the odd tonal and plot twists—the author strives to fill those gaps not with psychological analyses but rather historical context for the ambiguities. She’s less concerned, for instance, with whether Hamlet represents the first flower of the modern mind and instead keys into how the melancholy Dane and his father share a name, making it a study of “cumulative nostalgia” and our difficulty in escaping our pasts. Falstaff’s repeated appearances in multiple plays speak to Shakespeare’s crowd-pleasing tendencies. A Midsummer Night’s Dream is a bawdier and darker exploration of marriage than its teen-friendly interpretations suggest. Smith’s strict-constructionist analyses of the plays can be illuminating: Her understanding of British mores and theater culture in the Elizabethan era explains why Richard III only half-heartedly abandons its charismatic title character, and she is insightful in her discussion of how Twelfth Night labors to return to heterosexual convention after introducing a host of queer tropes. Smith's Shakespeare is eminently fallible, collaborative, and innovative, deliberately warping play structures and then sorting out how much he needs to un-warp them. Yet the book is neither scholarly nor as patiently introductory as works by experts like Stephen Greenblatt. Attempts to goose the language with hipper references—Much Ado About Nothing highlights the “ ‘bros before hoes’ ethic of the military,” and Falstaff is likened to Homer Simpson—mostly fall flat.

A brief but sometimes knotty and earnest set of studies best suited for Shakespeare enthusiasts.

Pub Date: April 21, 2020

ISBN: 978-1-5247-4854-8

Page Count: 368

Publisher: Pantheon

Review Posted Online: Dec. 18, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 15, 2020

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