The dog’s-eye-view perspective makes this a lighthearted choice for explaining adoption.

REAGANDOODLE AND LITTLE BUDDY FIND A FOREVER FAMILY

THINGS THAT ARE TRUE BECAUSE SOMEONE CHOSE YOU

A dog shares what it means to be adopted.

Reagandoodle has a new human best friend, Little Buddy, who is being adopted, just as he was, so the dog tells Little Buddy about all of the wonderful things adoption “means”: It means you belong and are loved, you will always have hugs and kisses, a safe place to sleep, and food to eat. Little Buddy’s parents “love [him] much deeper than oceans [and] more than the universe.” From discussions about celebrating Christmas and Easter and praying before dinner, readers will assume Christianity is an important part of this family’s beliefs. Little Buddy and the human members of his family present white in Sparks’ stiff but amiable watercolors. Typical childhood activities such as reading, napping, and selling lemonade are featured in this book consistently. The story is based on the experiences of the author’s grandchild, and photos of the real Reagandoodle and Little Buddy are presented along with the true story of Little Buddy’s journey from foster child to joining his family by adoption. Since this story is one of an older child being adopted and not an infant, this would be an appropriate book for families that have grown through the foster-adopt process.

The dog’s-eye-view perspective makes this a lighthearted choice for explaining adoption. (Picture book. 4-11)

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 2019

ISBN: 978-0-7369-7468-4

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Harvest House

Review Posted Online: July 14, 2019

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 2019

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A lively introduction to the work of a Hebrew language scholar and lover—and his family.

THE LANGUAGE OF ANGELS

A STORY ABOUT THE REINVENTION OF HEBREW

The ancient Hebrew language enters the modern world.

In 1885 Jerusalem, a young boy named Ben-Zion cannot converse with the polyglot children of his age because his father has decreed that he speak only Hebrew, “the first child in more than two thousand years” to do so. The father, Eliezer Ben-Yehuda, is a Zionist immigrant to Palestine and fervently believes that Jews from every country, speaking so many different languages, should return to the language of their ancestors and of Jewish Scripture. Ben-Zion is not popular in the neighborhood; some consider Hebrew a holy tongue to be used only in prayer. The father persists and finds that he needs to invent words to modernize the ancient language. Thus, by combining the Hebrew words for “wheel” and for “a pair of” he creates a word for bicycle. Ben-Yehuda’s work leads to a network of schools, a dictionary, and the eventual designation of Hebrew in 1948 as the national language of Israel. Michelson’s account, based on history, is presented as a story with invented dialogue, which he addresses in his author’s note. Gudeon’s digitized watercolor illustrations, full of children, are lively and feature Hebrew words and letters as part of the page design.

A lively introduction to the work of a Hebrew language scholar and lover—and his family. (afterword, further reading) (Picture book. 7-10)

Pub Date: Feb. 21, 2017

ISBN: 978-1-58089-636-8

Page Count: 32

Publisher: Charlesbridge

Review Posted Online: Dec. 6, 2016

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 15, 2016

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This will serve well in both religious and nonreligious settings for fall curriculum support.

CELEBRATING HARVEST

The annual harvest from farm to table is explored with a religious perspective, focusing on Christian harvest traditions and the Jewish celebration of Sukkot.

Crisp color photography highlights children in scenes of farming and the harvesting of fruits and vegetables. The book features several instructive points about the variety of produce available, the harvest concept and sharing. Finally, it covers two different yet corresponding religious ways to observe the harvest and thank God. Church-based harvest festivals are illustrated by the decorating of a church with various breads, wheat stalks and baskets of food. Sukkot is shown with the building and decorating of a Sukkah and how this symbol of a shelter or hut relates to the ancient Jewish celebration. An informative and eye-catching design on glossy paper offers a large, multicolored print, the majority of text blocks in black against soft pale backgrounds, with key words in bold blue; these are repeated in a vocabulary border at the bottom of each page. The text is largely framed in questions, encouraging personal response and discussion. The simplicity and functionality of the book’s premise is enhanced with an addendum of teaching suggestions for specific pages and more detailed background information about the concepts presented.

This will serve well in both religious and nonreligious settings for fall curriculum support. (websites, index) (Informational picture book. 5-7)

Pub Date: May 1, 2014

ISBN: 978-0-237-54373-0

Page Count: 26

Publisher: Evans/Trafalgar

Review Posted Online: March 3, 2014

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 15, 2014

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