IT'S WINGS THAT MAKE BIRDS FLY: The Story of a Boy by Sandra Wein

IT'S WINGS THAT MAKE BIRDS FLY: The Story of a Boy

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KIRKUS REVIEW

In size and format (photo on one page, solid text facing) this recalls My Dog Rinty, but that is only a handy referral prompted also by the coincidence that both boys are black: Otis' first-person narrative (based on taped conversations) is less a story than a string of responses to a mean and a kind grandmother, to a mean and a kind teacher, to animals in city and country, etc., and the photographs portray Otis and his world generally, not necessarily what he says he's doing. In short (and it's not), the text is virtually independent; it's also ungrammatical (""and the way he smelled he sure must not don't""). What comes across is the presence of a boy who, we're told at the conclusion, was killed while playing in the street shortly thereafter, but the vehicle is a photo-documentary, the emotions evoked pity, dismay, guilt are adult.

Pub Date: Nov. 22nd, 1968
Publisher: Pantheon