A THREAD IN THE TAPESTRY by Sarah Churchill

A THREAD IN THE TAPESTRY

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KIRKUS REVIEW

Sarah Churchill's ""personal and loving testament to the man who was my father"" serves to confirm the heroic and human stance of her illustrious sire. Her remembrance reaches back to the first day he took the children to see Chartwell, to favorite visitors there (Lawrence of Arabia, Lord Beaverbrook), to her own increasing recognition of her father's distinction. (""From fourteen onwards I was completely aware of the even greater importance of the man who was my father."") He permitted her to go on stage, but was not so happy about a marriage which at any rate ended badly. Through the WAAF, Sarah attended her father at Teheran and Yalta, was privy to his emotions (""War is a game played with a smiling face--but do you think there is laughter in my heart?"") then and later, when the English electorate rebuffed him and they spent a recuperative sojourn at Lake Como, painting and picnicking (""Painting was often to save my father's temper and mind""). In his last years she feels that he spoke little not only because of the physical difficulty but because ""he felt that he had said all he had to say, written all he could write, done all he could do, and was only waiting with increasing patience and courtesy for the end."" The paintings, Sir Winston's and Sarah's, appear in color here; hers of him seated with cigar and slouch hat, barely defines the face. This memoir also lacks definition, or mention of the touchier aspects of their relationship.

Pub Date: Aug. 14th, 1967
Publisher: Dodd Mead